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Chrysler Building

The Chrysler Building, apart from being the city’s most beautiful skyscraper, is also one surrounded by mystery and intrigue. One of the building’s main purposes was to express both the luxury and mechanical precision of the automobile in its Jazz Age, and with that being the case, for the first few years the building’s two bottom floors were home to an automobile showroom. The building also had several hidden apartments, one of them belonging to Walter P. Chrysler himself.

History

William H. Reynolds was a real estate speculator. He, much like many ambitious men, wished to construct the world’s tallest tower. As a result, Reynolds hired an unorthodox architect by the name of William Van Alen to design the building. A short while after, Walter Chrysler bought the plans and the lease in 1928, by which time Van Alen announced that the building’s planned height as to be 925 feet. However, Reynolds and Van Alen discovered an opponent in the race for the tallest tower, named H. Craig Severance. While the Chrysler stood at 925 feet, Severance’s building unfortunately came out on top with 927 feet. When Severance had declared himself the winner, however, a team of steelworkers pushed a 185 foot, ornate spire through the roof bringing the building to 1,048 feet.

The Chrysler Building Color Photograph
The Chrysler Building Color Photograph
The Chrysler Building Print on Canvas
The Chrysler Building Print on Canvas

Architecture

This building is the target of many photographers’ pieces because of its elaborate and symmetrical design. The slender tower of the Chrysler Building rises to a stainless steel spire perched above concentric arches by triangular windows. During the Chrysler’s construction, stainless steel cost too much for all with the exception of the most lavish builders. Therefore, the Chrysler contains more stainless steel than any other building in New York.

A few of the building’s popular features, besides the spire, include the large, winged gargoyles. They sit just below the spire, and stare off in four directions. The gargoyles grab the attentions of everyone from passer-bys to photographers. The interior of this breathtaking building is one the city’ shots beautiful and welcoming lobbies. The elevator doors and walls are embedded with African woods in ornate floral designs; each elevator cab is unique, no two are alike. The walls and floor are lined with smooth marble in warm tones that draw in visitors.

The paintings and photographs offered at nyArt.com, while unfortunately lacking the sense of comfort brought by the interior of the Chrysler Building, make up for it with the skillful and clever use of colors to depict how the sunlight bounces off the steel covering of the building. The photographs do their best to make the building look as unique and majestic as it does in real life, while the paintings play around with varieties of techniques and colors to show how the sun affect the building. The artworks and pieces all work to not only focus on the grand building and its beauty, but they also portray the lively aura surrounding it. To be a part of the magical aura created by the Chrysler Building, consider purchasing an artwork of your choice.